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Who does it?

  • The Booz Allen International Development and Diplomacy
    • Website: http://www.boozallen.com/consultants/civilian-government/international-development-diplomacy
    • Brief: Booz Allen assists governments in fostering prosperous economies and resilient, stable democracies. We work with government-sponsored agencies, development banks, nonprofit organizations, multilateral institutions, and foreign governments to improve the lives of citizens globally through local empowerment and development. For nearly half a century, Booz Allen has addressed the world’s most complex development challenges. We help our clients resolve systemic global development needs with tailored strategies across the areas of trade, micro-enterprise, competitiveness, democracy and governance, judicial reform, economic integration, fiscal and monetary policy agenda-setting, tax reform, public health, privatization, infrastructure, and technology-based transformation. We provide thought leadership and apply management consulting know-how to the international development context, using integrated, transformational, and holistic methodologies. The US Agency for International Development (USAID), US Department of State, Millennium Challenge Corporation, World Bank, and international governments have recognized our engagements.
  • The Booz Allen Socio-Cultural Development Center
    • Website: http://www.boozallen.com/consulting/view-our-work/48775647/scdc-case-study
    • Brief: The United States is confronting complex global problems that require in-depth understanding of national, regional, and local political factions, ethnic rivalries, and other cultural forces that shape events, force conflicts, and create human suffering. Challenges such as narco-terrorism, ethnic conflict, international gangs, cyber threats, pandemic disease, weapons of mass destruction, failed states, and global terrorism, require not just understanding motivations of the actors but also potential repercussions of any actions employed by the U.S. government. Booz Allen Hamilton’s Socio-Cultural Development Center (SCDC) offers a unique understanding of these challenges. The SCDC is a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort that includes sociologists, anthropologists, economists, psychologists, and scholars from other social science disciplines, as well as technical experts in such areas as geospatial analysis, modeling and simulation, and intelligence analysis. The Center has developed a formal methodology for assessing communities of interest that are driven by social, ethnic, and cultural beliefs and customs very different from our own. For example, in 2008, SCDC studied the key drivers of instability in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo; our analysis identified six interrelated causal factors. Following on this work, SCDC studied the strategic communications approach of al Qaeda in Yemen, and identified ways to counter the group’s influence using our own communications strategy that reflects insight into the various tribal groups. More recently, SCDC used a multidisciplinary, multi-sector approach to conduct a study of organized crime’s involvement in human trafficking in Mexico, with significant implications for coordination of anti-trafficking operations carried out by government agencies and non-governmental organizations.
  • Central Intelligence Agency, Center for the Study of Intelligence
    • Website: https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/about-csi.html
    • Brief: Our mission areas include the following activities: 1) Intelligence Research-Publish Studies in Intelligence, the journal of the American Intelligence Professional and host independent research and publish books and monographs on intelligence topics. 2) Intelligence History-Publish key documentary collections from the Cold War, conduct oral history project, produce monographs on CIA history and the history of intelligence, and support State Department’s Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) series. 3) Historical Records-Promote public understanding of intelligence. 4) Conferences and Seminars-Provide a forum for practitioners and scholars, make important research widely available, commemorate major historical events in the intelligence world, and interact with academic specialists. 5) University Programs-Encourage and improve the teaching of intelligence and sponsor CIA Officers-in-Residence on campuses.
  • Centre for Culture, Identity, and Education
    • Website: http://ccie.educ.ubc.ca/index.html
    • Brief: The Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE) was established in 2005 as part of a successful UBC proposal for a Canada Research Chair and is a cultural studies research centre that focuses on exploring various facets of and developments in the comprehensive issue of identity and its educational implications in local and international cultural contexts. Located in the Faculty of Education with Handel Kashope Wright as Director, the CCIE is a collaborative, cultural studies glocal praxis centre, meaning that it emphasizes utilizing cultural studies and related discourses in the promotion of local cultural and activist work as well as collaborative research undertaken at the local, national and global levels.
  • Center for Intelligence Research and Analysis
    • Website: http://www.defensegroupinc.com/cira/index.cfm
    • Brief: CIRA helps intelligence leaders, managers, collectors, and analysts improve the way they approach the intelligence mission. Today’s intelligence mission is expanding in terms of complexity, consumers, technical detail, and targets. Effective intelligence support requires not only constantly updating and refreshing knowledge on world realities and events; it also requires tailored training on emerging collection tools, analytic methods, and ways to portray intelligence information. The DGI Center for Intelligence Research and Analysis (CIRA) provides premier open source and cultural intelligence services to clients throughout the U.S. government and business community. Staffed by an experienced team of cleared analysts with advanced language skills, CIRA’s mission is to provide cutting-edge open source and cultural intelligence support to its clients. CIRA accomplishes its mission through the conduct of objective, independent, and relevant research and analysis, under strict quality guidelines.
  • Corporate Education Group
    • Website: http://www.corpedgroup.com/resources/
    • Brief: Corporate Education Group (CEG), originally founded at Boston University as the Boston University Corporate Education Center, is a premier provider of corporate training and consulting services. For nearly 25 years, CEG has collaborated with clients to optimize individual, team and organizational performance. Our focus is to provide relevant, actionable and practical solutions tailored to address the challenges specific to each client. CEG offers classes and certificate programs in the areas of project management, business analysis, business process management, PRINCE2, and leadership and management. CEG‘s training solutions are delivered in a traditional classroom on an open-enrollment basis or onsite at a client‘s location; on demand (self-paced online), or in a virtual instructor-led classroom. In addition to courses and certificate programs, CEG offers courseware customization and tailoring, action planning, competency modeling, assessments, coaching and mentoring, focus groups and other professional services. CEG has a rigorous and diagnostic approach to addressing client challenges and learning and development needs. Prior to offering a learning or consulting solution, CEG questions more deeply, probes more extensively, and listens more carefully. This proven capacity to effectively drill down to root causes of client capability gaps enables us to employ our broad portfolio of training programs and specialized services and tailor solutions that precisely fit our clients‘ needs. CEG’s learning solutions include post-training follow up that ensures that new skills and knowledge are immediately put into practice.
    • Cultural Intelligence Courses Website: http://www.corpedgroup.com/share/crse_result.asp
  • Cultural Intelligence
    • Website: http://www.cultural-intelligence.net/site/Home/Home.html
    • Brief: Although the military has become intimately familiar with the integral importance of cultural knowledge to current operations, there is limited depth thereafter to understand what socio-cultural knowledge is, how it is developed, and where it can be applied. The aim of this project is to implement concepts, theories, and methodologies unique to the academic discipline of socio-cultural anthropology to define a Cultural Intelligence discipline that can support contemporary military operations such as peace building, nation building, and counterinsurgency, by closing the cultural knowledge gap.
    • Research Link: http://www.cultural-intelligence.net/site/research.html
  • The Cultural Intelligence Center
    • Website: http://www.culturalq.com/index.html
    • Brief: The Cultural Intelligence Center (CQC) is dedicated to improving the understanding of Cultural Intelligence (CQ). It is led by Dr. Linn Van Dyne and Dr. David Livermore. A few of our clients include Bank of America, Cargill, IATA, London School of Economics, Medtronic, People to People Ambassador Group, Stanford University, and the U.S. Department of Justice. The center offers the first academically validated instrument to measure cultural intelligence. The center also sponsors research, conducts training, and presents workshops and information sessions on CQ to audiences around the world. We offer personalized cultural intelligence multi-rater feedback reports as well as cultural intelligence workshops that emphasize experiential learning. If you are a consultant or trainer interested in conducting CQ training, we welcome your inquiry. If you are an organization interested in using CQ to assess or train your employees, please contact us for additional information.
  • Empowerment and Resilience in Children Everywhere
    • Website: http://studentpages.scad.edu/~rstern20/erice/about.html
    • Brief: ERICE brings together child mental health professionals from Israel and Palestine to formulate and accomplish joint projects to enhance the well being of children and families that neighbor one another in this strife-torn region. Guided by the belief that children everywhere are to be cherished and that respect for and protection of children is a shared human value. ERICE works to promote human rights, joint action, training, and interventional projects focused on enhancing the well being of children and families affected by the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
  • George Mason University, The School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution
    • Website: http://scar.gmu.edu/other/8824
    • Brief: At The School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (S-CAR), faculty and students are committed to the development of theory, research, and practice that interrupt cycles of violence. S-CAR is an innovative academic resource for people and institutions worldwide. It comprises a community of scholars, graduate and undergraduate students, alumni, practitioners, and organizations in the field of peace making and conflict resolution. S-CAR is a Commonwealth Center for Excellence, recognized for its leadership in the field and its world-renowned faculty.
    • Research and Practice Website: http://scar.gmu.edu/research-and-practice
  • Georgetown University, Center for Contemporary Arab Studies
    • Website: http://ccas.georgetown.edu/
    • Brief: Who are the Arabs? To answer this question, a group of scholars in 1975 established Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS). They recognized that there was a failure on the part of American universities to provide their students with adequate opportunities to know the Arab world and sought to meet this need. Among the faculty who contributed greatly to the Center in its early days and years after were internationally renowned experts such as Dr. Hanna Batatu and Dr. Hisham Sharabi. The phrase that makes up the Center’s logo—“The Arabs Today,”—al-`Arab al-yawm—captures their vision.
    • Research and Publications Website: http://ccas.georgetown.edu/research/
  • GlobalECCO
    • Website: https://globalecco.org/about
    • Brief: GlobalECCO’s mission is to build and strengthen the Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program’s (CTFP) global alumni network of Combating Terrorism (CbT) experts and practitioners through innovative and engaging technologies and techniques that both enable and encourage collaborative partnership between individuals, nations, organizations, and cultures. GlobalECCO enables communication between members who may otherwise be isolated physically, and allows multiple community members to interact, facilitating collaboration and continuing education on critical security issues. It also helps to maintain a network of skilled operators with a wealth of expertise to share and to draw on.
  • Harvard University, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
    • Website: http://cmes.hmdc.harvard.edu/
    • Brief: The Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES) was founded in 1954 for the purpose of furthering the study of the Middle East at Harvard University. This mandate features a primary emphasis on the centuries since the rise of Islam and a concern with the wider Islamic world. CMES serves Harvard as the coordinating body and the primary source of support for the various courses and academic programs that cover the vast region from Morocco and North Africa to Turkey and Iran. The Center is home to key faculty related to Middle Eastern Studies including: the Arabic Program, Turkish Studies, the Moroccan Studies Program, several ongoing research projects, and a Visiting Scholar program that brings scholars from around the world. The range of interests of our faculty, students, associates and visiting scholars is rich, varied, and crosses multiple disciplines.
    • Research and Publication’s Website: http://cmes.hmdc.harvard.edu/research
  • Iranian Studies Initiative
    • Website: http://www.yale.edu/macmillan/cmes/iranstudies.htm
    • Brief: The Iranian Studies Initiative at the Yale MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies promotes study of Iran, Afghanistan and the Persian cultural sphere, with emphasis on regional and international affairs, domestic political developments as well as society, religion, culture, law, medicine and public health, economy, and environment. The ISI strives to reflect diverse views on security and foreign policy as well as nongovernmental voices and views of deprived groups such as women, intellectual descanters, religious and ethnic minorities, and nonconformists. It also encourages study of Iran and Afghanistan within the broader context of the Middle East, and especially in relation to the neighboring Iraq, Saudi Arabia and other countries of the Persian Gulf, as well as Pakistan, India, China, and Central Asia. The ISI also encourages studies of the emergent Iranian-American, Iranian-Canadian and various Iranian-European identities as they evolved over the past half a century and identify these communities’ contributions in business, science and academia. The state of scholarship in the field of Iranian Studies and ways of expanding it as well as the ways and means of making study of Persian culture and languages (ancient and modern) more accessible are among the ISI’s other objectives. These are to be achieved through curricular and academic means as well as extra-curricular activities involving Yale alumni and the faculty, the Iranian-American community in Connecticut, and an impressive number of Iranian academics in various universities in Connecticut and neighboring states.
  • The Jamestown Foundation
    • Website: http://www.jamestown.org/
    • Brief: The Jamestown Foundation’s mission is to inform and educate policy makers and the broader community about events and trends in those societies, which are strategically or tactically important to the United States and which frequently restrict access to such information. Utilizing indigenous and primary sources, Jamestown’s material is delivered without political bias, filter or agenda. It is often the only source of information, which should be, but is not always, available through official or intelligence channels, especially in regard to Eurasia and terrorism.
  • Linn Van Dyne
    • Website: http://linnvandyne.com/cq.html
    • Brief: In today’s increasingly global and diverse work settings, the ability to function effectively in multi-cultural situations is important for employees, managers, and organizations. Knowledge of your Cultural Intelligence provides insights about your capabilities to cope with multi-cultural situations, engage in cross-cultural interactions appropriately, and perform effectively in culturally diverse work groups. Knowledge of the Cultural Intelligence of others provides insights about how best to interact with others in multi-cultural situations, engage in cross-cultural interactions appropriately, and perform effectively in culturally diverse work groups.
  • Liu Institute for Global Issues
    • Website: http://www.ligi.ubc.ca/?p2=/modules/liu/researches/researches.jsp
    • Brief: The Liu Institute conducts, organizes, and facilitates research on global issues. They mobilize the new gained knowledge into better solutions and policy. This institute provides rigorous analysis in global issues including climate change, gender equality, and war conflicts that correspond to the main environment where the American military is most likely to become involved.
    • For their work in “Peace and Security” (including climate & security, disarmament, human security, regional security, and resource conflict), please click http://www.ligi.ubc.ca/peace_security.htm
  • Monk School of Global Affairs Centres
    • Main website: http://www.munkschool.utoronto.ca/mga/about-mga/about-the-mga.htm
    • Brief: The Master of Global Affairs degree positions graduates to accelerate their careers in business, government and NGOs, as these sectors pursue their strategies in an increasingly interconnected and multipolar world. The University of Toronto’s MGA program offers students the hard and soft skills they need to excel in their field of specialization, as well as an understanding of the broader economic, political, and social architecture of global affairs.
    • Website for list of Research Centres: http://www.munkschool.utoronto.ca/centres-programs/
  • Researching People, Cultural Intelligence
    • Website: http://www.researchingpeople.org.uk/
    • Brief: Cultural Intelligence is an independent research agency dedicated to improving the lives of people in the East of England through providing high quality research, consultation and evaluation services for the public and third sectors. We have special expertise in working with ‘hard to engage’ groups such as disaffected young people, asylum seekers and people with mental health issues and in researching difficult or sensitive subjects such as bereavement or sexual health. The organization was founded as Arts Marketing East in 1991 but has evolved as a social enterprise delivering bespoke research solutions mainly for the sectors of culture, community, health and learning within the East of England. We are particularly known for our innovative use of creative activity to engage people in the research and development process. Though constituted as a Limited Company since 1999 we are seeking to convert to a community interest company by 2015.
  • SecDev Group
    • http://secdev.ca/index.php
    • The SecDev Group is an operational consultancy focused on countries and regions at risk from violence and insecurity. We deliver our clients insights and access to a diverse range of cultures, audiences, challenging environments and ungoverned spaces.
  • Society for Intercultural Education Training and Research
    • Website: http://www.sietarusa.org/
    • Brief: The Society for Intercultural Education, Training and Research in the United States of America (SIETAR-USA) is an educational membership organization for those professionals who are concerned with the challenges and rewards of intercultural relations. Our members work within many environments and professions—business and industry, consulting, training, K-12 and higher education, counseling, all aspects of the media and arts, to name a few. SIETAR-USA members bring a vast array of experience and perspectives to the field of intercultural relations, both in the USA and around the world. SIETAR-USA is a point of connection for people from many cultural and professional backgrounds who explore differences on many levels; engage in cutting edge research related to cultural dimensions of interactions between and among individuals, organizations and political entities; continually search for and provide avenues to effective relations across cultures; and work with students and others to expand worldviews and build skills for successful interactions in intercultural arenas. These activities take place in multicultural or cross-cultural situations, within national borders or around the world. SIETAR-USA is a member of a network of similar SIETAR societies that span the globe. Society members connect by attending conferences at home and abroad, by networking, and by sharing information and resources. SIETAR holds Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status with the United Nations and the Council of Europe. Its members initiate joint projects, consulting and training assignments; foster personal and professional growth; develop national and international friendships; and work to model what we say we believe. We believe that we must all work toward effective and peaceful relations among the peoples of the world—not despite differences but because of them. It is a collective work that requires the efforts of many caring and concerned individuals who support each other in moving purposefully toward this common goal. Within one world, many perspectives: We invite you to become a part of SIETAR-USA.
    • DC Chapter Website: http://www.sietardc.org/
  • Uppsala University Human Security Project
    • Website:http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/program_overview/current_projects/human_security/
    • Brief: The term human security, in general, relates to developing a conceptualization of security at the level of the individual person, that is, addressing what factors can make a person’s life insecure. In the widest sense, many different aspects can be incorporated in an understanding of human security: economic security, food security, health security, environmental security, personal security, community security, political security, etc. UCDP’s work for the Human Security Report Project focuses on providing data for one crucial indicator of human security—collective violence. While UCDP has traditionally collected data on interstate and intrastate conflict, several new categories of collective violence have been added in order to achieve a better understanding of the full range of threats to human security posed by collective violence. Since 2002, the categories of non-state conflict (conflict between two groups, neither of which is the state), and one-sided violence by states or organized groups against civilians (such as massacres and genocide) have become part of the UCDP annual conflict data collection. At present, the UCDP has information on one-sided violence from 1989 onwards, and for non-state conflict from 1989 onwards. The ambition is to expand the scope of both these datasets further in the future.
  • Wayne State University, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies
    • Website: http://www.clas.wayne.edu/PCS/
    • Brief: On November 20, 1965 the Center for Teaching about War and Peace opened its doors under the leadership of Director Russell Broadhead and a committee of distinguished faculty. The mission then was to provide interdisciplinary, university wide, academic programs in the field of domestic and international conflict and peace issues. In 1987 the WSU Board of Governors, building upon this rich heritage, created The Center for Peace and Conflict Studies. The mission of the Center for Peace & Conflict Studies is to develop and implement projects, programs, curricula, research, and publications in areas of scholarship related to international and domestic peace, war, social justice, arms control, globalization, multicultural awareness and constructive conflict resolution. The Center for Peace & Conflict Studies addresses this mission in three ways. CPCS supports undergraduate and graduate student excellence through its academic programs. CPCS staff and students engage in scholarly research initiatives on aspects of domestic and international conflict management. CPCS provides community outreach programs that emphasize: conflict resolution, development of intercultural understanding, and enhance local knowledge of global affairs.
    • Research and Educational Programs’ Website: http://www.clas.wayne.edu/unit-inner.asp?WebPageID=226
  • Yale Center for Faith and Culture Reconciliation Program
    • Website: http://yale.edu/faith/rp/rp.htm
    • Brief: The newest program at the Yale Center for Faith & Culture, the Reconciliation Program’s goal is to promote reconciliation between Muslims and Christians, and between Muslim nations and the West, drawing on the resources of the Abrahamic faiths and the teachings and person of Jesus. In its initial phase, the Reconciliation Program is focused primarily on bridge-building scholarly research on the major theological, political, cultural, social and ethical issues, which traditionally divide Muslims and Christians, and on concerns, which unite them. The research of the Reconciliation Program aims to provide a fresh approach and new foundations to help Muslims, Christians and Jews understand one another more sympathetically.
  • Yale University, Council on Middle East Studies
    • Website: http://www.yale.edu/macmillan/cmes/JMEWS.htm
    • Brief: As globally significant developments in the Middle East unfold daily, the Council on Middle East Studies (CMES) continues its role as an academic platform where students and faculty can debate the myriad contemporary, historical, political, and cultural issues of relevance to the Middle East and North Africa and beyond. As a National Resource Center for Middle East Studies (funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI), CMES serves as a central resource for the Yale community, the region, and the nation on issues pertaining to the Middle East. CMES has been pivotal in the organization of major international conferences on wide-ranging topics — such as the region’s relations with the U.S, Middle Eastern immigration to the Americas, and the social and historical geography of the Middle East. To build upon the existing faculty base at Yale, CMES hosts a number of visiting scholars each year, supports expansion in the instruction of Middle Eastern languages, and assists in supporting the acquisition of new materials in the Near Eastern Collection at Yale’s Sterling Memorial Library. CMES also offers a weekly lecture/luncheon series, a yearlong film program, and many other educational events, all free and open to the public.
  • Extensive University Middle East Studies Programs:

 

  • The American Academic Research Institute in Iraq
    • Website: http://www.taarii.org/
    • Brief: TAARII (formerly the American Association for Research in Baghdad, AARB) has been established to promote scholarly research on and in Iraq and ancient Mesopotamia. The Institute, a consortium of American universities and museums, intends to establish a multidisciplinary American scholarly research center in Iraq when conditions permit. TAARII raises funds for graduate and post-graduate fellowships for Americans to work on Iraq in as broad a range of disciplines as possible. It also has a fellowship program for Iraqi academics to aid them in carrying out research in Iraq. TAARII initiates its own research projects and fosters joint projects between American and Iraqi academics. Like similar American overseas research centers, TAARII has as its primary focus the humanities and social sciences, as well as closely related natural sciences, but it will facilitate outstanding research in any legitimate academic field.
  • American University, College of Arts and Sciences
    • Website: http://www.american.edu/cas/arab/index.cfm
    • Brief: The Arab Studies Program is purposefully housed in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) and more specifically in the Department of Sociology to offer a more comprehensive view of the Arab World. This approach takes into consideration the organization of everyday life, literature, film, religion, gender, and history of the region as topics of interest in their own right. Arab Studies is able to do this by benefitting from the expertise on the region available across AU’s campus starting with CAS, and moving to the School of International Service, the School of Public Affairs, and finally reaching the School of Communications. Drawing together such a wide spectrum of courses and expertise affords students the ability to learn about the Arab world wherever their starting point may be. Whether they are interested in foreign affairs, emergent markets, human rights, understanding their heritage, or simply wanting to learn about this region of the world, the program encourages students to go beyond their original scope. Students quickly learn that the Arab World is not monolithic and yet not a false construct. The Arab World exists and is recognizable despite the variations across the region in terms of economics, quality of living, topography, and levels of stability. At the very core, the Arab League represents the Arab world through its membership of twenty-two countries stretching across the Mediterranean, to the Arabian Peninsula, and down to the North Africa. Population figures as of 2010 estimate that there are over 350,000,000 Arabs with almost half under the age of 24. The region has countries with some of the highest quality of life standards and others with some of the lowest. Historically, the region has been studied through a single lens of gender, international relations, or oil, which made the region coherent and perhaps manageable, albeit often at the cost of thorough understanding. The Arab Studies Minor is the cornerstone of the program. Students are required to take two foundational courses (Arab Societies and World of Islam) and another five elective courses from an approved list of courses. The program is also in the process of expanding in order to offer its minors additional opportunities to attend lectures and events, intern, and generally get exposure to the Arab world outside of the classroom. Ultimately, students will graduate with a more myriad understanding of the Arab world that will prepare them for encounters with Arab countries or for some a better reflection on their place of origin. The program is designed to serve outsiders and natives to the Arab region alike. If you have questions or would like to learn more about Arab Studies, requirements for the minor, or the relevant events across campus please refer to the links on the left panel. Alternatively, feel free to email arabstudies@american.edu.
  • Boston University, The American Institute of Afghan Studies
    • Website: http://www.bu.edu/aias/
    • Brief: The American Institute for Afghanistan Studies is a private, scholarly institution founded in 2003 to support research on all aspects of Afghanistan’s history and culture and to promote scholarly ties between Afghanistan and the United States. The Institute is a developing member of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers. Objectives: To improve the quality and quantity of research on Afghanistan by providing logistical and financial support for scholars in the United States, Afghanistan, and elsewhere. To create opportunities for scholars in the US, Afghanistan, and elsewhere to develop their knowledge of Afghanistan by providing fellowships and grants. To foster an international community of scholars and scientists who are dedicated to the study of Afghanistan. To provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge and scholarly insights through organization of workshops, symposia, and conferences. To support dissemination of scholarly production on Afghanistan by any means including newsletters, journals, and monographs in electronic and print media and documentary film. To enhance public understanding of Afghanistan and its relationship to the United States through public lectures and activities directed at broad audiences. To organize and seek funding for collaborative research efforts, especially between Afghan and US scholars that cannot be undertaken by individual researchers alone. To encourage and support identification, authentication, archiving, cataloguing and publication in print and electronic form of significant source materials important for the study of Afghanistan and to build a significant Institute library in Afghanistan. To forge and strengthen relationships between institutions, scholars, and students in Afghanistan and the United States by identifying common interests and concerns that can serve as the foundation for binational collaboration and exchange. To establish and maintain field offices within Afghanistan that can facilitate the work of visiting scholars and serve as vibrant centers for scholarly life accessible to all who are interested. To raise funds from public and private sources to support specific activities or to be applied to an endowment aimed at providing permanent support for the Institute.
  • Brandeis University, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies Program
    • Website: http://www.brandeis.edu/programs/imes/undergrad/index.html
    • Brief: The Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies (IMES) Program is an interdisciplinary curriculum sponsored by the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies in conjunction with the faculty from several other departments. It is designed to provide a strong foundation in Middle Eastern studies with a specialized knowledge of Islam. The major requires students to take elective courses from the departments represented by the faculty committee. Key contributing departments, in addition to Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, include politics, history, economics, sociology, African and Afro-American studies and anthropology. With a solid training in language, political theory and praxis, history, economics, sociology and anthropology, the major is especially appropriate for students wishing to pursue graduate work, particularly in the field of Middle Eastern studies, or for those who wish to pursue careers dealing directly or indirectly with the Middle East.
  • Columbia University, The Middle East Institute
    • Website: http://www.mei.columbia.edu/
    • Brief: The Middle East Institute of Columbia University, founded in 1954, has helped to set the national pace in developing an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the present, with a primary focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Fostering an inter-regional and multi-disciplinary approach to the region, the Institute focuses on the Arab countries, Armenia, Iran, Israel, Turkey, Central Asia, and Muslim Diaspora communities. The Institute sponsors approximately 30 lunch-time talks per year on topics ranging from art and literature to current events, hosts conferences, and provides a neutral atmosphere for scholarly and student exchanges of views on issues concerning the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. It offers courses and outreach seminars to teachers and adult education groups, briefs journalists, and generally acts as a clearing-house for requests for information on the region and its peoples by the media, educational professionals, and the interested public, drawing upon the expertise of its own staff and the faculty of the School of International and Public Affairs and Columbia University.
  • Duke University, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
    • Website: http://asianmideast.duke.edu/academics
    • Brief: Asian & Middle Eastern Studies offers a curriculum that reflects the geocultural specificities of the areas and an increasing awareness of the interconnectedness of the world. The curriculum, based on a theoretical framework that examines contemporary national and ethnic cultures of Asia and Middle East within a global context, provides students with a critical understanding of the languages, literatures, and cultures in the regions. The AMES major seeks to develop deep linguistic and transcultural competence and analytical abilities in order to prepare students for professional work or advanced graduate study in a number of international arenas. AMES offers language coursework in Arabic, Modern Hebrew, Hindi, Chinese, Japanese and Korean at all levels from introductory to advanced. The language courses aim to develop the abilities to view the target culture as well as one’s own from the perspective of the language and to interpret, communicate and negotiate effectively in the language in a variety of settings for a variety of purposes. We encourage the furtherance and expansion of the language study begun at Duke in the context of study abroad programs designed, selected or approved by the department in such locations as Cairo, Beijing or Kunming. In conjunction with language courses, AMES offers a range of courses covering literatures and cultures of the nations, regions and areas, taught in English and ranging from first-year seminars to advanced work for upper-division majors. The courses foster a view of language, literature and culture at once indigenous and global, informed by local histories of internal development as well as by theories of cross-cultural influence. This view draws on theoretical inquiries into indigenous cultural identities associated with such conceptual categories as gender, class, ethnicity, nation, aesthetics, and sexuality. Our mission for undergraduate education is: to help students to develop a high degree of fluency in the language(s) of concentration, spoken and written, and to foster an informed view of language, literature and culture based on the knowledge of local traditions and a theoretical understanding of interconnectedness of the globe. The course requirements for the major provide an intellectual foundation that includes both study of language and culture practice and a critical framework for analyzing cultural experience.
  • Foundation for Iranian Studies
    • Website: http://fis-iran.org/
    • Brief: The Foundation for Iranian Studies was established in 1981 as a non-profit educational and research institution to preserve, study, and transmit Iran’s cultural heritage; to study contemporary issues in Iranian government and society; and to point to the probable social, economic, political, and military directions Iran might take in the 21st century. The Foundation will increasingly serve as an information center for the study of Iran’s past, present and future. Non-partisan and non-political, the Foundation believes authentic, objective scholarship can and should encompass a multiplicity of intellectual contributions and a diversity of opinions.
  • Georgetown University, Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies
    • Website: http://arabic.georgetown.edu/
    • Brief: Welcome to The Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies, institutional home to four of the most distinguished programs at Georgetown University: The Undergraduate Programs in Arabic, The M.A and Ph.D. Programs in Arabic Literature, Language and Linguistics, The Ph.D. Program in Islamic Studies, The Division of Eastern Mediterranean Languages (Hebrew, Persian, Turkish). Although we teach four languages in the department, Arabic remains at the center of what we do. Indeed, the need for area-studies specialists with advanced proficiency in Arabic has never been greater or more compelling. As Americans struggle to build a better understanding of the Arab world, its society, its religion, and its culture, we have continued to develop a determined and vigorous long-term strategy to create and maintain linguistic and cultural expertise among our students. Arabic is the native language of over 200 million people in 20 different countries as well as the liturgical language for over a billion Muslims. It is a member of the Semitic language family and has a long and distinguished literary and intellectual tradition. It is now a key factor in understanding and negotiating crucial contemporary global issues. In accordance with Georgetown’s Jesuit ethos, we stress knowledge of Arabic as a path to living altruistically and creatively in a globally integrated world. Our Undergraduate Programs support the largest Arabic enrollment of any university in the U.S. We work closely with undergraduates to create an understanding of the Arab world through the highest-quality teaching of Arabic language and culture. A particular goal of this department at the undergraduate level is to help students reach advanced levels of communicative competence (proficiency) in both spoken and written Arabic. Despite the rapid growth of the past few years, our department remains student centered, and Arabic majors have advisers who guide them through their studies from the day they arrive on campus. Arabic majors may also qualify for the Sultan Qaboos bin Said Scholarship, a financial aid opportunity designed especially for them. We also offer an accelerated Master’s degree program for qualified undergraduate students. We have an active study abroad program with sites in Egypt, Morocco, and other Arab countries, and summer programs in Alexandria, Doha, and Ifrane. Additionally, the Washington area offers opportunities for activities involving Arab embassies and other Arab and Middle Eastern organizations. Our students often arrange internships with government agencies or non-profit organizations that focus on the Arab world and the Middle East. Georgetown was first in the country to establish its M.A and Ph.D. Programs in Arabic Literature, Language and Linguistics. Our Arabic faculty are top-notch, engaged in active research projects on dialectology, linguistics, Islamic studies, as well as classical and contemporary Arabic literature. Our graduates go on to successful careers in academia, government and the policy world. The recently established a Ph.D. Program in Islamic Studies seeks to advance knowledge and understanding of classical and modern Islamic religious thought and Islamic textual traditions, and to provide understanding of Islamic culture and intellectual history in the pre-modern and modern periods. The program offers undergraduate and graduate training in the study of the history, religion, culture, society, languages, literatures, and thought of the Islamic world, and introduces students to the traditional and modern scholarly approaches to the study of Islam. The Islamic Studies Ph.D. program at Georgetown combines all the disciplines that traditionally informed the study of Islam in the US: philology, Biblical studies, history, religious studies, and area studies. Moreover, the program complements the world-renowned strength of Georgetown faculty in modern Islamic studies by providing solid grounding in the study of Islam in the classical period. The existing strength of the Arabic program at Georgetown, as well as the superb quality and professional standing of the Georgetown faculty with expertise in the study of Islam, makes Georgetown an ideal place for pursuing a doctoral degree in Islamic Studies. The Division of Eastern Mediterranean Languages is where instruction in Hebrew, Persian and Turkish takes place. Under the direction of dedicated, active faculty, these programs have been growing steadily in recent years, preparing undergraduates and graduate students for study and work across the Middle East. With increased funding, we look forward to developing our strengths in these fields even more. In this regard, please look for new courses, including Ottoman Turkish and Media Persian, in the coming semesters. Finally, as our undergraduate and graduate students quickly learn, the strengths of the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies are greatly amplified by the fact that Georgetown is the home to the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS) and the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding (CMCU), research centers that offer degree programs, lectures, and coursework on a wide range of topics concerning the Arab world. Please feel free to contact us by phoning (202) 687-5743 or by emailing us at arabic@georgetown.edu.
  • Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service
    • Website: http://ccas.georgetown.edu/
    • Brief: Who are the Arabs? To answer this question, a group of scholars in 1975 established Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS). They recognized that there was a failure on the part of American universities to provide their students with adequate opportunities to know the Arab world and sought to meet this need. Among the faculty who contributed greatly to the Center in its early days and years after were internationally renowned experts such as Dr. Hanna Batatu and Dr. Hisham Sharabi. The phrase that makes up the Center’s logo—“The Arabs Today,”—al-`Arab al-yawm—captures their vision. The logo was designed by Palestinian artist Kamal Boullata. The Center is part of Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, the oldest school of international affairs in the United States. In recognition of the Center’s work for the first 10 years, Senator J. William Fulbright wrote in 1985, “With remarkable foresight Georgetown University moved to fill the need for understanding the Arab people by creating the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies…a significant contribution to our country.” Building on this legacy, the Center has established itself as the most comprehensive university-based Arab studies program in the United States. It focuses on the contemporary Arab world, from Morocco to the Gulf, through teaching, scholarship, public events, research, publications, and outreach to the community. Today, CCAS is a premier source of information on issues concerning the Arab world both within the classroom and for the larger community. The Center’s Master of Arts in Arab Studies (MAAS) program is distinguished by its emphasis on study of the contemporary Arab world and its rigorous Arabic language training. An initial goal was to offer a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to the Arab world, one that would address the Arab past in its efforts to better analyze the Arab present and future. Georgetown University has achieved this goal; it offers more than 150 Arab world-related courses each year, through CCAS as well as GU’s departments of Arabic, history, government, business, economics, and law, among others. The MAAS program has grown to include the option of graduate certificate programs and joint degrees with other departments. Students from other disciplines have the option of adding an undergraduate or graduate Certificate in Arab Studies. Alumni of the MAAS program have distinguished themselves in key areas of economy, culture, and government around the world. Students, faculty, and the community have the opportunity to learn from an impressive and varied list of invited speakers who provide an academic context for understanding the Arab region. The public affairs program now stands as an essential part of the Center and the student experience, hosting or sponsoring over 75 events each year. These events provide a forum for academics, policy makers, and representatives from nongovernmental organizations, political leaders, activists, filmmakers, visual artists, authors, and musicians from the Arab world, the United States, and other countries. The Center’s annual two-day symposium has attracted scholars from all over the world. The Center continues to attract expert faculty who publish widely and serve as a resource to the media, such as the Washington Post, NPR, CNN, and Al-Jazeera. In addition to teaching, these professors travel internationally, engaging in research projects and joint conferences, and bring dynamic learning back to Georgetown. They play an active role in professional associations, such as the Middle East Studies Association. Dissemination of information and analyses beyond the campus is a priority. Through its publications and website, the Center is well known within the academic and greater community. Publications include occasional papers, books, and online articles. The Center’s newsletter now reaches over 4,500 local, national, and overseas readers. A Community Resource Service was established in 1983 to develop and provide resources for education about the Arab region and Islam. Teachers from kindergarten through 12th grade can participate in training programs and have access to a growing lending library and teaching modules. Faculty and graduate students from the Center visit local schools to share their expertise. This program has been recognized nationally for its contribution to furthering understanding of the Arab world in the classroom. Since its inception, the Center has benefited from the support of numerous individuals, corporations, and government sources. The Center has flourished, adding more tenuretrack faculty positions, staff, research opportunities, and scholarships in order to meet growing demands. Initial endowments of faculty lines have been supplemented by new research and outreach grants and support for fellowships. Since 1997, CCAS has served as the core of Georgetown University’s National Resource Center on the Middle East, funded by a Title VI grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Few regions command as much attention as the Arab world. Georgetown University’s Center for Contemporary Arab Studies has furthered understanding of this vital area with excellence and distinction, illuminating the lives and experiences of the Arabs today—al- `Arab al-yawm.
  • International Institute of Islamic Thought
    • Website: http://www.iiit.org/AboutUs/AboutIIIT/tabid/66/Default.aspx
    • Brief: The International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT) is a private, non-profit, academic, cultural and educational institution, concerned with general issues of Islamic thought and education. The Institute was established in the United States of America in 1981 (1401 AH). It is independent of local politics, party orientations and ideological bias. The headquarters of the Institute are situated in Herndon, Virginia, in the suburbs of Washington DC. IIIT has established cooperation with a number of institutions and organizations in a number of capitals worldwide in order to carry out the Institute’s activities and programs. The Institute is governed by a Board of Trustees that meets regularly and periodically elects one of its members to serve as President. The Institute is an intellectual forum working on educational, academic and societal issues from an Islamic perspective to promote and support research projects, organize intellectual and cultural meetings, publish scholarly works, and engage in teaching and training. It has established a distinct intellectual trend in Islamic thought, which relates to the vivid legacy of the Ummah (Muslim nation) and its continuous efforts of intellectual and methodological reform, principally in the field of education, classical knowledge and social science. This involves a large number of researchers and scholars from various parts of the world. The Institute conducts its educational and training activities and courses through its institutional division, The Fairfax Institute. The International Institute of Islamic Thought is dedicated to the revival and reform of Islamic thought and its methodology in order to enable the Ummah to deal effectively with present challenges, and contribute to the progress of human civilization in ways that will give it a meaning and a direction derived from divine guidance. The realization of such a position will help the Ummah regain its intellectual and cultural identity and re-affirm its presence as a dynamic civilization. The Institute promotes academic research on the methodology and philosophy of various disciplines, and gives special emphasis to the development of Islamic scholarship in contemporary social sciences. The program, which has become known as “Islamization of Knowledge”, endeavors to elucidate Islamic concepts that integrate Islamic revealed knowledge with human knowledge and revives Islamic ethical and moral knowledge, through education, teaching and support of scholarly research. IIIT aspires to conduct courses in order to promote its objective to reform Islamic thought, to bridge the intellectual divide between the Islamic tradition and Western civilization. In its teaching and selection of teachers and courses, IIIT endeavors promote moderation, inter-faith dialog and good citizenship.
  • John Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies
    • Website: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/academics/regional-studies/middle-east/
    • Brief: Middle East Studies and the Arabic language were first introduced into the SAIS curriculum in 1946, but the Program as it stands today was created in 1950 as the country’s first graduate program on the modern Middle East. Under the distinguished direction of Professor Majid Khadduri, it would remain throughout the 1950s the largest area studies program and home to some of the first Ph.D. students at SAIS. In 1980, Khadduri was succeeded by Lebanese-born Professor Fouad Ajami, who for 31-year oversaw a small but thriving program while amassing prestigious academic honors and guiding policy as a reputed public intellectual. In 2011, Camille Pecastaing was appointed acting director and devoted himself to continue the already-long scholarly tradition and bring it into an era of profound regional change. The region is a fascinating case study for a student of international relations: failed-states, oil-rich states, labor-rich states, marginal environments, political transitions, state-to-state conflict, nuclear proliferation… the Middle East offers an abundance of challenges that are examined in the different courses offered by the Middle East Studies Program. Courses combine the historical and the theoretical, cultural and social studies, along with political and diplomatic history. The geographic range runs from Morocco to Iran, from Turkey to Somalia. The program in Middle East Studies has had a consistent vision of mixing the classic study of the culture and history of the region with the analysis contemporary issues. Religions, ethnicity, tribalism are scrutinized in the context of the region, as are issues of economic development. The Middle East Studies Program at SAIS is also distinctive for its emphasis on scholarship over polemics. Issues are examined in relation to actual policies, but not from a partisan point of view. Students from diverse backgrounds and opinions very naturally come together in a common quest for knowledge and understanding of real life phenomena. This neutrality is particularly befitting those seeking a career in government or in international institutions. Graduates of the program will enter careers in public affairs and the private sector with a firm grounding in the social and historical context and traditions of the Middle East, a working knowledge of Arabic, and a broad understanding of the politics and life of the region. Present from prestigious NGOs to energy conglomerates, from consulting to banking, and in many governments, intelligence agencies and international institutions, graduates of the SAIS Middle East Studies Program form a cosmopolitan community of successful professionals.
  • New York University, Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies
    • Website: http://meis.as.nyu.edu/page/home
    • Brief: The study of the Middle East and Islam at New York University has a long and distinguished history, which may well have begun with the university’s founding in 1831. It is known that by 1837 the faculty included both a professor of Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Ethiopic, and a professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages; courses were offered in Arabic, Persian, biblical and rabbinic Hebrew, Chaldaic and Syriac. The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Literatures (NELL) was established in 1966; the late Professor R. Bayly Winder served as the department’s first chair. In 1973 the department moved into its present quarters at the corner of Washington Square South and Sullivan Street, in the newly completed building (designed by Philip Johnson) which also houses the Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies. NELL originally included faculty specializing in Hebrew and Judaic studies, but in 1986 the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies was established as a separate department. For some years NYU’s Program in Religious Studies also operated under the aegis of NELL. To better reflect its changing composition and orientation, the department changed its name to Middle Eastern Studies during the 1995-96 academic year. In 2004, in recognition of the developing scholarly range of its faculty, its name was changed once again, to Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies – abbreviated as MEIS. People at NYU and elsewhere often confuse the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies with the Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies. In fact, though they share the same building and collaborate closely, the two are distinct entities. The Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies is an academic department with its own faculty and offers an undergraduate major (and minor) as well as a graduate program leading to the Ph.D. In contrast, the Kevorkian Center is an area studies center, funded in part by the federal government through the Title VI program, whose mission is to encourage and coordinate teaching and research on the Middle East at NYU and to sponsor educational, informational and outreach programs for teachers, the general public and other people interested in the region. The Kevorkian Center also administers the Program in Near Eastern Studies (NES) leading to the M.A., as well as master’s degrees with business, journalism and museum studies. The Kevorkian Center is not a department and has no tenured or tenure-track faculty of its own.
  • Princeton University, Near Eastern Studies
    • Website: http://www.princeton.edu/nes/
    • Brief: The Department of Near Eastern Studies has been a leader in the study of the Middle East since 1927 when it was founded as the Department of Oriental Languages and Literatures. While traditionally the strength of the department has been in the medieval and pre-modern studies of the geographical area that includes the Arab lands, Iran, Israel, and Turkey, greater emphasis has been given more recently to the modern Muslim world in its entirety, including the Caucasus, Central Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. This development recognizes the many interconnections of the Muslim acumen and enables NES to offer its students an interdisciplinary program of studies that breaks out of the artificial constraints imposed by the traditional geographical focus. For undergraduates, the Department of Near Eastern Studies offers both a liberal arts concentration (“major”) designed to give students competence in a Near Eastern language and a broad knowledge of the civilizations, history, and literatures of the ancient, medieval, and modern Near East and beyond, and the option of earning a Certificate in Language and Culture, thus documenting advanced language and cultural proficiency. For undergraduates who do not wish to major in NES but nonetheless would like to combine the study of the modern and contemporary Near East with a social science or other discipline, there is the option of enrolling in the Program in Near Eastern Studies for an NEP Certificate. For graduate students interested in pursuing an academic career, the Department of Near Eastern Studies offers a program of study leading to the Ph.D. There is tremendous flexibility in the individual course of study and in the choice of dissertation topic. For students contemplating careers in government, business, or journalism, where a Ph.D. is not a requirement, the Program in Near Eastern Studies also offers a two-year degree curriculum leading to the M.A. as a final degree. This special program is governed by an Interdepartmental Committee. The Program Director oversees the student’s course selection, master’s thesis, and examinations.
  • Princeton University, The Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia
    • Website: http://www.princeton.edu/transregional/
    • Brief: The Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia (TRI) was established in 1994 with the generous support of HH Prince Moulay Hicham Benabdallah (’85) of Morocco. Its founding director is Professor Abdellah Hammoudi of the Department of Anthropology at Princeton.  The Institute’s mission is to encourage and enhance the comparative study of issues central to the Middle East-North Africa-Central Asia region. Within this geographical setting, the Institute focuses research on development, economic, social and political issues, democratization and human rights. The Institute also seeks to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and the dissemination of information about this region to the academic and wider community. Since the fall 2007 the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia (TRI) has been directed by Professor Bernard Haykel of the Department of Near Eastern Studies (NES). In September 2008 TRI became fully integrated within the Department of Near Eastern Studies (NES), and because of its focus on the contemporary social, economic and political affairs of the Arab and Muslim worlds, TRI’s presence in NES will bolster the department’s considerable offerings and strengths on the study of the modern Middle East. This will be accomplished in several ways. First, this academic year’s research theme is centered on the politics of youth in the Arab and Muslim worlds, a relatively neglected yet important topic for understanding the problems and potentials of the region.  TRI hopes to lead the effort in framing new questions as well as providing a fresh perspective on the challenges facing the largest demographic segment in Arab and Muslim societies. Second, TRI is directing a joint project devoted to oil and energy in the Middle East. This is part of a multi-year joint effort by the Department of Near Eastern Studies and the Princeton Environmental Institute to develop expertise and research excellence on three facets of the unequaled fossil fuel reserves in the Persian Gulf region. These are: 1) the geo-political and security considerations as well as the domestic politics of energy in the Gulf; 2) the economic and financial aspects of oil and gas markets; 3) the technological features and environmental implications of these particular reserves. As with the topic devoted to youth culture, TRI is running a speakers’ series related to the oil and energy project and hosting two research fellows. There are two themes we would like to focus on during this academic year: 1) the study of the effects of the recent petro-boom cycle, and now bust, and to compare this to the previous ones in the 1970s and 80s; 2) the study of the new industrialization policies of the Gulf countries as well as their food security policies. The two research fellows for the oil and energy project are: 1) Roger Stern who is working on the Iranian oil economy as well as US military doctrines with respect to force projection into the Persian Gulf; 2) Eckart Woertz of the Gulf Research Center in Dubai is completing a book on the politics of food security of the Gulf Cooperation Countries. The principal activities of the Institute include: Annually selecting one or more visiting research fellows to spend a year or two in the Institute. Fellows are generally younger scholars who show great promise in research and publication in areas of study related to the interests of the Institute. Presenting an annual series of public lectures and other events organized around a theme chosen each year. Organizing conferences that bring together scholars, journalists and public figures from the Middle East-North Africa-Central Asia region, the United States and the rest of the world. Publishing, on an occasional basis, articles and monographs resulting from our lecture series, conferences and other events. Assisting through sponsorship scholars and other organizations that are contributing to the study of the region.
  • University of California at Berkeley, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
    •  Website: http://cmes.berkeley.edu/
    • Brief: The CMES promotes the interdisciplinary study of the Middle East on the University of California, Berkeley campus and beyond. From colloquia and conferences, to grant and research programs, to lecture and film series, we organize a wide variety of academic events and extracurricular activities. Feel free to explore our website and join our mailing list for the latest updates on events and programs. The Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES) at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) seeks to foster academic pursuit of the Middle East and promote public awareness of the region’s diverse peoples and cultures as well as their connection to wider global contexts. As a federally funded Title VI National Resource Center, the CMES is recognized as one of the country’s most important sources of information about the Arab states, Iran, Israel, Turkey, and the broader Islamic World. Middle Eastern studies have been taught at UCB for over a century, with the CMES in existence since 1963. More than 100 courses related to the Middle East are regularly offered on campus in two-dozen departments and professional schools. Our commitment to deepening knowledge of the Middle East is constantly renewed through the support we offer for specialist faculty research, language teaching and learning, and visiting faculty. A range of endowments allows us to operate grant programs to facilitate the advanced study of the Middle East by UCB faculty and students at all levels. Affiliates of the CMES include highly specialized faculty, more broadly focused academics, post-doctoral scholars, and graduate and undergraduate students. They come from all over the world to participate in the many colloquia and conferences organized by the Center. The CMES holds institutional memberships in a number of scholarly organizations in which our faculty and students are most active. We are among the founding members of the Middle East Studies Association (MESA), and are an active member of the American Institute of Yemeni Studies, the American Research Institute in Turkey, the American Institute for Maghrib Studies, and the American Association for Teachers of Turkic Languages. In addition to academic enrichment on campus, the CMES strives to share its resources with the broadest possible constituency, which currently includes pre- and post-secondary educators and students, independent scholars, the media, business sectors, civic and religious groups, and the general public. In addition to the community and cultural activities it routinely offers, including lecture and film series, seminars, and museum and gallery exhibits, the Middle East Speakers Bureau and the Office for Resources in International and Area Studies (ORIAS) exist primarily for the purpose of outreach. As the Middle East assumes an increasingly important role on the world stage, the work of the CMES will continue to grow in relevance. Moreover, we will remain as concerned with contemporary Iran as with Persian literature, and as engaged with the shifting political landscapes in Egypt and Turkey as with Ottoman history, providing a depth and breadth of knowledge unavailable elsewhere.
  • University of Michigan, Near Eastern Studies
    • Website: http://lsa.umich.edu/neareast/
    • Brief: The Department of Near Eastern Studies is part of the College of Literature, Science and the Arts, which administers its undergraduate programs leading to the B.A. degrees, and of the Rackham School of Graduate Studies, which administers its graduate programs leading to M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. The regular faculty numbers about 26 of which 12 are full professors. The Department offers several programs of study at the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. levels, covering Near Eastern languages, literatures, civilizations, linguistics, history, Ancient studies, Biblical studies, Egyptology, Medieval Islamic history and Islamic studies.
  • University of Toronto, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
    • Website: http://www.utoronto.ca/nmc/index.htm
    • Brief: The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations came into existence on July 1, 1996 as a result of the merger of the formerly separate departments of Near Eastern Studies (NES) and Middle East and Islamic Studies (MEI). These departments, under various designations, have existed in the University of Toronto for over 150 years. Near East is generally understood to refer to the region at the eastern end of the Mediterranean and beyond, from ancient times up to the advent of Islam in the seventh century CE. Middle East refers to a much broader geographical area whose predominant Islamic culture in mediaeval and modern times has stretched to North Africa and Spain in the west and to Central Asia, India and South Asia in the east. The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations is concerned with the interdisciplinary study of the civilizations and cultures of the Near and Middle East from Neolithic times until the present, including their languages and literatures [Akkadian (Assyro-Babylonian); Arabic; Aramaic, and its closely related dialect Syriac; ancient Egyptian; Hellenistic Greek; biblical, rabbinic, mediaeval and modern Hebrew; Persian and Turkish], archaeology, history, art and architecture. The Department’s programs are conceived in the broad tradition of the humanities and provide an opportunity to study non-western complex societies and civilizations. An understanding of these societies will reveal the ultimate roots and historical development of western civilization. As it happens, three world religions originated in this geographical region. The Department offers courses on the origins and earliest phases of Judaism and, as a contributor to the Jewish Studies Program, on mediaeval and modern Jewish history, culture and thought, even though such pursuits sometimes lead to Europe and other places beyond the Middle East. Although the Department deals with eastern (Syriac) Christianity, the study of Christianity as a religion falls within the purview of the Department for the Study of Religion. The study of Islam as a religion and the development of Islamic thought, and their role in the creation of Islamic civilization, are major concerns of the NMC Department.
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