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Amir Fakhravar discusses constitutionalism in the Middle East

April 8, 2014
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On April 4, 2014, Amir Fakhravar, Research Fellow for IWP’s Center for Culture and Security, discussed “The Role of Democracy in Drafting a New Constitution in the Middle East” at the East Coast Colleges Social Science Association 2014-40th Annual Conference.  A video of his remarks can be found below.

Amir Fakhravar to discuss constitutionalism in the Middle East

April 3, 2014
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On Friday, April 4, Research Fellow Amir Fakhravar will discuss “The Role of Democracy in Drafting a New Constitution in the Middle East” at the East Coast Colleges Social Science Association 2014-40th Annual Conference.

Mr. Fakhravar’s presentation will examine the nature of constitutionalism in the Middle East. His research explores topics arising in the comparative study of constitutional systems and constitutional questions of law. Concerns include defining what a constitution actually is and identifying its function within a political system. The presentation will highlight some of the principles of democracy and will explain various ways other nations, such as South Africa, have resolved contemporary constitutional questions.

Please click here for more information.

Research Fellow Amir Fakhravar speaks at Fuel For Truth Boot Camp

March 24, 2014
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CCS Research Fellow Amir Fakhravar recently spoke about Iran at Feul For Truth’s Boot Camp Program.  According to its website, Fuel For Truth “equips young Americans with the basic facts and skills necessary to advocate to young adults, to increase support for Israel and America through education of radical Islamic terror.”

During his remarks, Mr. Fakhravar noted that most Iranians,  particularly the nation’s youth, support a secular democracy.

Amir at Feul for Truth

Photo courtesy of Feul For Truth’s facebook page.

Amir Fakhravar to discuss Iranian constitutional reform

February 18, 2014
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Research Fellow Amir Fakhravar will discuss “Iranian Constitutional Reform: The Role of Democracy in Drafting a New Constitution” at a conference sponsored by the Policy Studies Organization entitled “Middle East Dialogue 2014: Strategies for Change” on February 27.

Mr. Fakhravar’s talk will explore the definition and function of a constitution, the problems with the current Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran, and possible ways to resolve these problems while promoting democracy.  Please click here to learn more about his talk.

Please click here to learn more about the conference and register.

Amir Fakhravar to speak at Academy of Criminal Justice Science conference

January 23, 2014
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Amir Fakhravar, Fellow at the Center for Culture and Security, will speak at the 51st Annual Meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences on February 19 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The theme of the conference is “Perceptions of Crime and Justice,” and Mr. Fakhravar will discuss “Capital Punishment in Authoritarian Regimes.”

Please click here for the conference program.

Amir Fakhravar teaching at Texas State University

January 22, 2014
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Amir Fakhravar, Research Fellow at the Center for Culture and Security, has recently begun teaching as an adjunct professor at Texas State University.  This semester, he is teaching “Comparative Constitutional Law” and “Political Crimes.”

Amir teaching at Texas State University (2)Amir teaching at Texas State University (1)

Of note: U.S. Governmental Information Operations and Strategic Communications: A Discredited Tool or User Failure? Implications for Future Conflict

December 9, 2013
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U.S. Governmental Information Operations and Strategic Communications: A Discredited Tool or User Failure? Implications for Future Conflict

Authored by Dr. Steve Tatham.
Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College

Through the prism of operations in Afghanistan, the author examines how the U.S. Government’s Strategic Communication (SC) and, in particular, the Department of Defense’s (DoD) Information Operations (IO) and Military Information Support to Operations (MISO) programs, have contributed to U.S. strategic and foreign policy objectives. It assesses whether current practice, which is largely predicated on ideas of positively shaping audiences perceptions and attitudes towards the United States, is actually fit for purpose. Indeed, it finds that the United States has for many years now been encouraged by large contractors to approach communications objectives through techniques heavily influenced by civilian advertising and marketing, which attempt to change hostile attitudes to the United States and its foreign policy in the belief that this will subsequently reduce hostile behavior. While an attitudinal approach may work in convincing U.S. citizens to buy consumer products, it does not easily translate to the conflict- and crisis-riven societies to which it has been routinely applied since September 11, 2001.

Please click here for the full report from the Strategic Studies Institute: http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1182

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